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Saturday, July 25, 2020 | History

1 edition of Winter rye and triticale for grazing and grain. found in the catalog.

Winter rye and triticale for grazing and grain.

Winter rye and triticale for grazing and grain.

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Published by Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food in Alnwick .
Written in English


Edition Notes

At head of t.p. : ADAS.

SeriesLeaflet / Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food -- 501
ContributionsAgricultural Development and Advisory Service.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14396939M

Triticale. Triticale has grown in popularity for those looking to mechanically harvest small grains. The biggest reason for increased use is the longer harvest window. Unlike cereal rye, triticale will mature less rapidly and subsequently allow more time to harvest high-quality forage.   Triticale, a human-made hybrid of wheat and rye, has never enjoyed the popularity of either of its parent crops in Canada. However, researchers have found that triticale varieties offer so many benefits to western Canadian farmers that it may soon be .

  Small-grains species used for overseeding include wheat, rye, oats, barley and triticale. Though not a small-grains species, ryegrass is also a very common choice for sod-seeding. Factors such as temperature, soil texture, soil pH and rainfall play an important role in species adaptability to a .   After a year of drought and weather challenges, some cattle farmers are putting in extra cover crops this fall to ease the forage burden. Here’s the top six cover crops Midwest cattle farmers are using to stretch fall and winter grazing. Cereal grass. Cereal rye is one of the top cover crops used in the U.S. for both agronomic and grazing. It is popular because it is cold-hardy and can be.

However, grazing quality will be better with triticale than for rye. Spring oats seeded in the fall can be very productive but will die out over the winter. However, with adequate fall moisture, grazing should be available from October through December and then again in early spring for the rye, triticale and wheat. Triticale (pronounced trit-ih-KAY-lee) is a hybrid of wheat and rye that has been evaluated for grain and forage production. It grows tall like rye, but matures later like wheat. It has a relatively wide leaf and can produce high quality forage if grazed or cut in vegetative or early reproductive stages.


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Winter rye and triticale for grazing and grain Download PDF EPUB FB2

Winter wheat is a significant cash grain crop in the Southeast, and rye, oats and wheat are planted on hundreds of thousands of acres in each state for winter grazing. Currently, winter barley production is limited, and triticale is a potential cash crop but is not grown extensively in the Southeast.

Triticale will be ready for spring grazing 2 to 3 weeks later than rye in spring but will continue to provide good forage several weeks later into late spring than rye. If grazed lightly or not at all in spring, both rye and triticale can produce very high, single cutting hay yields.

Triticale is the cross of wheat and rye. The first varieties had spring wheats as parents and would winterkill easily. Now, winter wheats are being used as parents, which has resulted in varieties being available that have good winter hardiness, and some varieties have grain Winter rye and triticale for grazing and grain.

book similar to wheat. Triticale generally has higher forage yields, butFile Size: 48KB. Winter Triticale is a winter annual grain developed through a cross between winter wheat and winter rye.

It is commonly planted for forage production and displays desirable traits from each of its parent species. Winter Triticale is extremely winter hardy like cereal rye but produces high quality forage much like winter wheat.

Note: Grazing on wet, poorly drained soils can result in plant damage and reduced spring growth. Rye responds well to high rates of nitrogen fertilizer.

Apply 60 – 80 lbs./A nitrogen as a side-dress application in late winter. Rotational or strip grazing greatly improves utilization efficiency of rye forage particularly during spring flush.

Winter wheat has been the small grain of choice for winter and spring grazing in the southern plains where higher winter temperatures allow growth to continue, although slowly.

In Nebraska, where wheat goes dormant, though, its carrying capacity is not as high as triticale or rye, but it. TRITICALE is a promising small grain forage that has characteristics of both its parents, wheat and cereal rye. There are spring and winter varieties of triticale, but there are no extensive evaluations of fall or spring forage production for either type.

It is more susceptible to winter injury than cereal rye. Winter rye, also referred to as cereal rye, is a very hardy and vigorous small grain planted in the fall. Winter rye is an excellent selection for cover cropping, forage, or in wildlife plantings.

It is widely adapted across the United States and can be grown under a broad range of conditions. With its quick germination, ground cover, and ability to be planted much later than other species. Winter triticale, a cross between rye and wheat, has been suggested by Tom Kilcer in New York State as being preferable in both forage yield and quality to either fall rye or winter wheat.

His research indicates that winter triticale harvested at the flag-leaf stage (rather than boot-stage) can be very high quality feed for dairy cows. Small grains used for grazing include cereal rye, wheat, barley, winter oats, and triticale.

Rye, the most winter hardy of the small grains, grows quickly and can be grazed as early as 4 to 6 weeks after planting. It provides high quality feed when rotationally grazed but palatability and quality declines quickly as stand matures in the spring.

For many livestock producers, cover crops and winter grazing go hand-in-hand; however, perhaps the most valuable time for grazing cover crops is in. the spring. Winter annual cereal grains such as rye, wheat, and triticale grow fastest and provide the most tonnage in the early spring, before cool-season grasses start to grow.

Winter rye also typically makes up at least a portion of my planting recommendations for the majority of my clients in virtually every state I visit. Winter Rye has become so much more than just a quality food plot forage for poor soils, and I am excited to discuss the extreme power of Winter Rye for Whitetails: 1.

Poor Soil First Plot Option. As a grain, triticale is an outstanding feed, and delicious and healthful food grain. Triticale grain has been found to be an excellent choice in Europe for production of ethanol.

Triticale offers the high yields, value, and superior tolerances to drought, low pH, and important diseases and insects needed to be profitable in global markets. A variety of winter and spring cereal grains can be grown in New England.

Oats and barley are spring grains, whereas triticale, wheat, and spelt have both winter and spring adaptability. Cereal rye, a common cover crop for the area, is for winter production only. By Mary Drewnoski In the Midwest, planting winter-hardy cereal grasses such as winter rye or triticale after fall-harvested corn or soybeans can provide both soil benefits and a grazing resource in the spring.

Trial Results - Winter Triticale - Carrington Trial Results - Forage - Winter Triticale - Carrington Trial Results - Winter Triticale - Carrington Trial Results - Forage - Winter Triticale - Carrington Trial Results - Winter Triticale - Wishek.

Annual winter grasses include oats, barley, rye, wheat, triticale and annual ryegrass. Rye (Elbon rye) and oats generally provide the earliest grazing, but they also mature first, followed by wheat, barley and ryegrass. Because ryegrass matures late, it pro-vides 4 to 6 weeks of extra grazing in the spring.

Wheat and oats have for many years. Triticale: Triticale is a cross between wheat and rye and is well adapted to a range of soils and does well on sandy soils.

Tolerance to low soil pH is better than wheat but not as good as rye. Triticale is better suited as pasture than hay or silage.

Seeding rate is to lbs. per acre. As far as winter annual cereal forages are concerned, rye has ruled the roost for many years as a crop that fits nicely after corn silage harvest in Northern regions. Wheat, on the other hand, is a favorite in the West.

Though rye and wheat are still fan favorites, triticale is making inroads with dairy producers regardless of locale. Spring-seeded winter triticale won’t produce seed, and it can be used for grazing.

The digestibility, water soluble sugars, and forage productivity are similar to oat and rye. Thanks to a high lysine concentration (%), triticale can be used in feed rations to replace corn, which has only a lysine concentration of %.

Winter triticale is more winter hardy than winter barley, hence is a consistent component of a cover crop than winter barley. Is winter triticale better than winter rye?

Rye and triticale are similarly resistant to wheat and barley viruses and can be planted early with less concern about being a green bridge. Austrian Winter Pea. This annual legume is best suited to well-drained soils with high clay content. Recommended Varieties: Common, Maple, and Whistler.

– Rye. Rye is the small grain most widely used for winter grazing. Rye is more cold tolerant than oats and generally produces more forage than either oat or wheat.Winter hardy species such as cereal rye or winter triticale can be grazed in the fall if growth reaches 6 inches or greater.

However, cattle should be pulled when the grass is 4 inches high, if spring harvest/grazing is desired. When grazing in the spring, begin grazing when the grass .